Spring 2013 Seminars

The First-Year Seminar Program (FYSP) seeks to provide new students an opportunity to study together with a small number of their classmates and a distinguished instructor. The topics vary enormously, but all are intended to expose you to academic discourse, both oral and written, so that you can develop your skills as a young scholar and make a smooth adjustment to college. The 89S seminars of the FYSP are not the only seminars available to first-year students. In addition to the various FOCUS program seminars, there are also the so-called 80S-Series courses, which are introductory-level seminars but are not  limited in enrollment to freshmen. There are also seminars available in most academic departments and programs that you may qualify to take, so don't overlook these options.

AMES 89S FILM AND VISUAL CULTURE  (ALP, CCI, EI)


This course is designed to acquaint students with the histories and theories of film within the larger context of visual culture in the 20th century. Born out of various modes of representation, film brings to the last century various new ways of seeing. What we see helps shape and re-shape how we see the world. Arguably the most powerful art form in the last century, film both informs and is informed by how the world is perceived and, more importantly, how the world can and should be perceived. Along with its artistic and entertaining purposes, film, as an ultimate image (and sound) machine, presents to its audiences’ visual fields numerous different horizons of imagination. Imagination here means more than a mere private or individual matter because it also impacts how a community, a region, a nation, a culture, or any combination or derivation of the above, is visualized, represented and constructed. To understand how film works – how it produces meaning and how meaning is understood and contested – is also to understand how it participates in the making of our social, political and cultural lives.


Instructor: 
Guo-Juin Hong, Ph.D. (University of California, Berkeley) is an Associate Professor of Chinese Literature and Culture and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. His teaching and research interests include film theory and historiography, visual culture and culture theories.

AMES 89S MODERN HINDUISM: COLONIAL AND NATIONALIST CONTEXTS (CZ, CCI, EI)
 Cross-listed – See course description under RELIGION 89S


Instructor: William Elison

ARTHIST 89S FROM THE ART OF THE PLEASURE QUARTERS TO TOKYO POP (ALP, CZ, R)


Japanese Print Culture, 17th century to the present. Starting in the bordellos of 17th-century Edo and spanning up through the kitsch of contemporary pop culture, this course will examine the vibrant and often bawdy forms of Japanese print culture. It is designed to be both an introduction to Japanese printmaking practices and to serve as a forum for the critical evaluation of related theoretical issues. By examining the function of prints in the Edo demimonde (ukiyo-e), for example, the class will be introduced to the spectacular world of the Kabuki theater and the erotic culture it sustained. Prints of the pleasure quarters reveal the intimate relationship between sexuality, economics, and artistic production. At the same time, frequently incurring government censure, the same prints display the politically charged nature of erotic expression. Class sessions will include close analysis of images and discussion of larger concerns related to gender, representation, aesthetics, artistic practice, and patronage.


Instructor: 
Gennifer Weisenfeld, Ph.D. ( Princeton University) is an Associate Professor of Art, Art History and Visual Studies. Her fields of teaching and research interests are in Japanese art, design history, graphic design, the history of photography, late 19th and early 20th century art, modern art, and visual studies/visual culture.

BIOLOGY 89S HOW ORGANISMS COMMUNICATE (NS, STS)


Speech often is cited as one of the unique characteristics of Homo sapiens that sets us apart from other animals. How unique is human language? How unique is human music? What, if any, precursors to language or music do we find in the natural world? How do organisms other than humans communicate and what do they have to say? This course will explore the communicative world of animals, from the simplest chemical signals used by slime molds when they aggregate to the complex vocalizations of birds, whales and primates – including humans. We will explore fundamental principles of evolution that shape communication systems, the physics and physiology of different communication modalities, and connections that can be made across very different ways of communicating. This class is not just for scientists, however – anyone with an interest in how the natural world relates to the human condition will find this class a useful multidisciplinary exploration of how one organism may affect the behavior of another. Students will prepare for class sessions using readings, video lecture segments, and other multimedia materials, with class time reserved for team-based discussion of this material. Other activities include demonstrations, presentations, reading and interpreting primary scientific literature, and short writing assignments.


Instructor: Rindy Anderson, Ph.D. (University of Miami) is a Research Associate in Biology. As a behavioral ecologist, she studies the form and function of animal communication systems. Her research examines the proximate mechanisms underlying the evolution of behavior, especially acoustic communication behavior in birds and humans. Dr. Anderson also is a self-made master at mini-golf and aficionado of pop music across several generations.
Instructor: Stephen Nowicki
Stephen Nowicki, Ph.D. (Cornell University) is Bass Fellow and Professor in the Departments of Biology, and in Psychology and Neuroscience in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, and in the Department of Neurobiology in Duke Medical School. He is Dean and Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education. His research interests span behavioral ecology and neuroethology, in particular the structure, function, and evolution of animal communication systems. In his spare time he plays trombone and juggles.

BIOLOGY 89S FROM GENES TO TRAITS: AN EXPLORATION OF WHAT GENES DO AND HOW THEY DO IT (NS, STS)


This seminar will explore how we have come to understand the relationships between genotype and phenotype. We will begin by exploring the historical background of modern genetics and the various ways in which geneticists have thought about the inheritance of traits and the statistical associations among genes and traits. After that we will explore how systems biology can be used to understand the causal pathways by which genes affect traits. Examples will be taken from the biomedical literature with a focus on genetic diseases (cancer, Parkinson’s, sickle cell disease and Prader-Willi syndrome among others) and the roles of genetic background and environment in determining how (and why) genes affect traits. In addition to readings you will be required to prepare several short papers and oral presentations.


Instructor: Fred Nijhout, Ph.D. (Harvard University) is a Professor of Biology. His teaching and research interests lie in understanding developmental physiology, particularly the regulatory processes in the postembryonic development of insects. He is also interested in the evolution of those processes, and the insights this provides into the mechanisms by which genes, environment and physiology affect the development and evolution of complex traits.

BIOLOGY 89S PATHWAYS TO BIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH (NS)


Science is not a collection of facts to be memorized, but rather it is a way of thinking about the world around us. Scientific research, therefore, is not about knowing the answers but instead is about asking questions. In this course, students will learn about the wide range of research being conducted in the biological and biomedical sciences at Duke, from genetics and evolution to pharmacology and neurobiology. Because science is highly collaborative, students will work in teams to process and understand the scientific literature and to work on case studies. We will have frequent guests -- including faculty, postdocs, and graduate students -- who will not only participate in discussions about their research, but who will also share their stories about how they became passionate about becoming a scientific researcher. This course is designed for students who are interested in life-long careers in scientific research rather than careers in medicine. No prior research experience is required, and students from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to enroll.


Instructor: 
Julie Reynolds, Ph.D. (University of California, Berkeley) is an Assistant Professor of the Practice in Biology. She teaches writing-to-learn courses in Biology for both first-year students and seniors who are completing honors theses. Her specialties are in Ecology and Population Biology.

BIOLOGY 89S THE POLITICS OF EVOLUTION (NS)

This course will explore the cultural setting in which evolutionary theory was derived, and its subsequent cultural impacts. Special focus will be placed on the ongoing complexities related to popular acceptance of evolutionary theory, particularly in the United States. According to a study conducted in the year 2006, more than 80 percent of people living in European countries, including Denmark, Sweden, and France, said they accepted the concept of evolution. In the United States, only 14 percent of adults thought that evolution was "definitely true." The only country included in the study where adults were more likely than Americans to reject evolution was Turkey. Students will read and evaluate key historical works and current readings to explore the evidence underlying the theory of evolution, as well as case studies and contemporary media reports focused on ongoing controversies relating to science education.

Instructor: Anne Yoder, Ph.D. (Duke University) is a Professor of Biology. She is the Director of the Duke Lemur Center with research interests in phylogeny and the evolution of mammals, with an emphasis on the mammals of Madagascar; conservation genetics; historical biogeography and biodiversity of Madagascar; Old World biogeography.

BIOLOGY 89S SEA CHANGE: HUMAN INTERACTIONS WITH A CHANGING OCEAN (NS, STS)


The course addresses the impacts of global climate change on coastal and marine environments and ecosystems as well as human culture and society. The topics are intentionally focused on the interface between science and society from popular articles to primary literature. Topics such as carbon footprints, seal level rise and fisheries and ocean zoning are addressed.


Instructor: 
Stephanie Jeffries, Ph.D. (North Carolina State University) is a Visiting Instructor. Her teaching and research interests focus on ecology, conservation biology, biodiversity, forestry, plant community ecology, and marine biology as well as outdoor recreation.

BIOLOGY 89S/ENVIRON 89S SYMBIOSIS (NS)


We have learned biology, mostly one organism at a time, as distinct and independently evolving entities. Yet, symbiotic interactions among organisms, ranging from mutualism to parasitism, are much more the rule than the exception in nature. Together we will explore the unnoticed symbiotic world as an integral component of life, including the human body. We will unveil symbiotic mechanisms whereby the existence of most species depends on intimate interactions with other, often drastically different, species.


Instructor: 
Francois Lutzoni, Ph.D. (Duke University) is an Associate Professor of Biology. His teaching and research interests are multidisciplinary, focusing on the evolution of symbiotic fungi, theoretical aspects of phylogenetics, the reconstruction of the fungal tree of life and systematics of lichen-forming fungi.
Instructor: Jennifer Wernegreen
Jennifer Wernegreen, Ph.D. (Yale University) is an Associate Professor in the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy and the Nicholas School of the Environment. Her teaching and research interests focus on evolutionary biology, symbiosis, molecular ecology, comparative genomics and microbiology.

CHEM 89S SCIENCE OF COOKING (NS)


This course will present the chemical and physical transformations behind creating food. Contemporary culinary techniques will be introduced and put in practice in the kitchen-lab. A professional chef, artist in residence for the term, will also discuss the scientific and creative processes used in molecular gastronomy. The final project will involve the students in the organization of a banquet.


Instructor: 
Patrick Charbonneau, Ph.D. (Harvard University) is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics. His teaching and research interests focus on theoretical chemistry and soft condensed matter physics.

CULANTH 89S MUSIC AS MIRROR, MEDIATOR AND PROPHET (CZ, SS, CCI, R)


This course investigates the ways in which music serves as a mirror, a mediator and a prophet in societies undergoing political and social transitions. It explores how history is reflected, the present is expressed and the future is envisioned through music.


Instructor: 
Ingrid Byerly, Ph.D. (Duke University) is a Senior Lecturing Fellow of Cultural Anthropology. Her fields of teaching and research interest are in cross-cultural communication, video production, cultural anthropology, education and ethnomusicology.

ECON 89S ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: POVERTY, RACE AND THE ENVIRONMENT (SS, EI)


Environmental justice refers to the idea that individuals should not be disproportionately exposed to pollution based on race, income, or being part of some other disadvantaged group. Formalized in an Executive Order by Bill Clinton in 1994, environmental justice is a mandate imposed on the EPA that has recently become a policy priority. This course will examine the important question of equity in environmental policy making and how economic forces impact our ability to address it. The course will explore the nature of the harms associated with different forms of pollution exposure, including long-term effects and labor market implications, empirical techniques used to document disproportionate exposure and the mechanisms that lead to it. The course will consider case studies but will also introduce concepts from economic theory and econometric methods.


Instructor: 
Chris Timmins, Ph.D. (Stanford University) is a Professor of Economics, with a secondary appointment in the Nicholas School of the Environment. He specializes in the subjects of natural resource and environment economics, industrial organization and development, and public and regional economics.

EDUC 89S GROWING UP GIRL (SS, CCI, EI)


A study of the experiences of girls growing up in contemporary social, cultural, and geographic landscapes with a focus on interdisciplinary scholarship in the social sciences and the humanities. Foster deeper, richer understandings of girls’ lives, identities, and psychosocial experiences. Explore viable educational and economic futures for and with girls, particularly girls coming of age in marginalized communities and cultural groups both within the U.S. and globally.


Instructor: 
Deborah Hicks, Ed.D. (Harvard University) is a Research Scholar in the Program in Education and is the Director of the Spring Creek Literacy Project. Her interests are in education, poverty and social class, and girl studies.

ENVIRON 89S ENVIRONMENTALISM AND AMERICAN VALUES (EI)
 Cross-listed – See course description under POLSCI 89S


Instructor: Nora Hanagan

ENVIRON 89S INTO THE WOODS: EXPLORING THE DUKE FOREST (NS, STS)


What kind of tree is that? Why does it grow here? What other organisms depends on it? Preserving biodiversity, whether in a remote tropical jungle or right in your back yard, is a major world issue. Through class discussion and local field trips, this course will introduce students to the history and ecology of the Duke Forest, and the importance of forests to our quality of life. Topics will include community ecology and natural history, organism and habitat identification, and history and management of the Duke Forest. Field trips during class period will visit forested areas around campus as well as research and management sites in the Duke Forest.


Instructor: 
Jeff Pippen, M.S. (University of Michigan) is an Instructor in the Nicholas School of the Environment. His areas of teaching and research interest are Biodiversity, Forestry, Climate Change, Wildlife Surveys and Management, Community Ecology, and Phylogenetic Systematics.

ENVIRON 89S SYMBIOSIS (NS) 
Cross-listed – See course description under BIOLOGY 89S

Instructors: Francois Lutzoni and Jennifer Wernegreen

JEWISHST 89S MESSIAHS AND MESSIANIC MOVEMENTS (ALP, CZ, CCI, EI)
 Cross-listed – See course description under RELIGION 89S


Instructors: Laura Lieber and Shalom Goldman

LIT 89S GIRLS GO GLOBAL (ALP, SS, CCI, EI, R) 
Cross-listed – See course description under WOMENST 89S


Instructor: Kimberly Lamm

LIT 89S LOVE, IN THEORY (ALP, CCI)


Love, in all its manifestations, material, sexual, familial, romantic, social and sentimental comes with a theory, always. This is true whether we acknowledge it or not. Our goal here is to study modern figures in literature and philosophy who have contemplated love, in theory. Freud, Jung, and Fromm are among the most prominent of these. We will study them, as well as a few other key figures. The goal is that we each leave the class with a consciously formed unique theory of love. To that end, each student will write and present their own love manifesto as the final project of the class.


Instructor: 
Negar Mottahedeh, Ph.D. (University of Minnesota) is an Associate Professor in the Program in Literature. Her areas of teaching and research interest are in Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Film Studies, Media Studies, and Middle Eastern Studies.

LIT 89S PRISON, THE U.S. AND THE SUBJECT (ALP, CZ, CCI, EI)


Have you ever asked yourself anything like, “What are the questions for which prison is the answer? What is particular about our self-understanding that might be tied to the increasing emergence of prison as important to the working of our social order? How is it that the United States, understood by its general public to be the state exemplifying “freedom” and democracy, is also the carceral state par excellence in the world? What might we learn about the U.S. idea of the individual (or the “subject”) by examining the intersection of the prison and the state?” If you haven’t asked yourself these or similar questions, perhaps you might consider the thinking prompted by these questions. We can begin to think about these questions by considering something that Thomas Paine (author of Common Sense) wrote: “. . . it is as impossible for an individual to acquire personal property without the aid of society, as it is for him to make land originally.” Paine wrote this as part of his argument for the indivisible nature of the individual and society. This course draws on Paine’s understanding of this indivisibility as the basis for our examination of the intersection of prison, state, and the subject as a way to understand the increasing solidification of our social order’s idea of the citizen—the state’s responsible individual—as a production of the intertwining, over our history, of both the prison and the idea of prison. We are going to explore the increasing ubiquity of the carceral state’s hold on the public imagination. In relation to Paine’s idea that the individual and society are intensely intertwined, this course will investigate the history of prison in the United States, what role prison plays in our understanding of the state, and our ideas of individual self-understanding and identity produced within the constraints of the U.S. “state.” We will take up the question of “freedom” as a commonsensical notion that is influenced by the making of incarceration as the limit clause for that freedom.


Instructor: Wahneema Lubiano, Ph.D. (Stanford University) is an Associate Professor of Literature. Her teaching and research interests include cultural studies, African-American Literature, African-American popular culture and film, women’s studies, black intellectual history and nationalism.

MATH 89S MATHEMATICAL FINANCE: STOCKS, DERIVATIVES AND FINANCIAL CRISES (QS)


The course begins with the risk and reward associated with stocks and derivatives. We then introduce the popular models of these financial instruments, specifically isolating their central assumptions and conceptual building blocks. The course concludes with exploring the role of derivatives in the most recent financial crisis that adversely affected the U.S. and global economy. No prior course on finance is required. Prerequisites: Math 22 or 112 or 112L or 122L.


Instructor: Arlie Petters, Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) is the Benjamin Powell Professor and Professor of Mathematics, Physics and Business Administration.  His fields of teaching and research interests include mathematical physics and STEM models in finance.

MATH 89S THE EMERGING SCIENCE OF COMPLEX DATA  (QS, R)


Introduction to a new scientific problem/opportunity: large amounts of complex and poorly understood data which must be analyzed. Survey of classical and modern data analysis techniques: factor analysis, wavelets, diffusion geometry, topology, among others. Many applications, including finance, image analysis, high-energy physics, and genomics. Discussion of past and current use of data analysis in social policy. Needed mathematical background will be provided. Opportunities for summer research. Prerequisites Math 111L or 122L or equivalent, Math 216 would be helpful, but not required.


Instructor: Paul Bendich, Ph.D. (Duke University) is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics.  His research interests include computational topology, topological data analysis, machine learning and the intersections within these fields.  He has taught math at many levels (beginning calculus, linear algebra, and topology) and is especially interested in creating intuitive pictures of high-level mathematics and statistics.
Instructor: John Harer
John Harer, Ph.D. (University of California, Berkeley) is a Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science.  His specialties and research interests include computational topology, computational biology, and algorithms. His primary research is in the use of geometric, combinatorial and computational techniques to study a variety of problems in data analysis, shape recognition, image segmentation, plant root architecture, biological networks and gene expression.

MUSIC 89S MUSICAL SHAKESPEARE (ALP, CCI)


Considered by many to be the greatest writer in English of all time (if not any language), the works of William Shakespeare have exerted a powerful influence, not only on literature and drama, but on the other arts as well. Composers of every age from the Renaissance to present day, have created music expressly for the performance of his plays and sonnets as well as music inspired by and based upon his canon. Our interdisciplinary seminar will explore this repertoire by examining masterworks of music in relation to the Shakespearean works which spawned their creation. We have chosen four works: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Othello and The Tempest. These plays will be read and reviewed in relation to compositions by Purcell, Mendelssohn, Britten, Berlioz, Bernstein, Verdi, Mozart, Sibelius, and others with an emphasis on how these composers sought to capture in their medium of sound, the essence of the Shakespearean dramatic work under consideration. Relationships between works will be explored as well as between the genres they represent.


Instructor: 
Harry Davidson, M.M. (Pacific Lutheran University) is a Professor of the Practice in the Music department and Director of the Duke Symphony Orchestra. He made his major orchestra debut conducting the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. He has guest conducted numerous professional and conservatory ensembles, including the Charlotte Symphony, the Akron Symphony, and the Cleveland Institute of Music and Oberlin College Conservatory orchestras.

MUSIC 89S THE SOUL OF JAZZ (ALP)


This course explores African American dimensions of jazz history by looking closely into three areas: first, the participatory scene of early New Orleans, the birth place of jazz, ca. 1895-1920; second, the innovative and sophisticated path of Duke Ellington’s orchestra, from the mid-1920s through 1965; third the varied career of Miles Davis through Bebop, Cool, ballad style, and Fusion. The very different social aspirations and musical styles of these musicians will give us a varied sense of how jazz manifested African-American musical identities at a very deep and soulful level. No experience with music necessary.


Instructor: 
Tom Brothers, Ph.D. (University of California, Berkeley) is a Professor of Music. His teaching and research interests include Jazz, Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Music, and African-American Music.

MUSIC 89S WOMEN AND MUSIC (ALP)


This seminar will explore the music of women composers, primarily in the tradition of art music, extending from Hildegard of Bingen from the twelfth century and the baroque composer Antonia Bembo to nineteenth and twentieth-century composers such as Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Clara Schumann, Amy Beach, Ruth Crawford Seeger, and Mary Lou Williams, among others. Topics to be considered include music analysis, issues of gender and class in the careers of women composers, their choice of musical genre and performance venues, and changing attitudes in their reception history.


Instructor: R. Larry Todd, Ph.D. (Yale University) is an Arts and Sciences Professor of Music. His specialty is in musicology and his teaching and research interests include 18th-20th Century music, and the music of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy and Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel.

PHYSEDU 89S HISTORY AND ISSUES OF AMERICAN SPORTS


How American sports developed, their place in education and society, and the issue and problems created and faced in today's world form the core of this seminar. Topics include: Olympic Games (ancient and modern); the end of amateurism in sport; the decline of youth fitness and the rise of superstars; politics, racism and nationalism in sports; the drug crisis; and the impact of technology on sport. The major focus will be on American sport history, studied through primary documents and an examination of the major example of modern sport: big-time intercollegiate athletics.


Instructor: 
Al Buehler, M.A. (University of North Carolina) coached Duke track & field for 45 years, retiring from the head coaching position in 2000. During his coaching tenure, he coached several all-Americans and was three-times team manager for the U.S. Olympic Track & Field Team, plus many more achievements on the state, national, and international level. He has been inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame and the Duke Sports Hall of Fame. He has just retired as chair of the HPER Department after serving nineteen years in this position.

PHYSEDU 89S HOT TOPICS IN HEALTH  


This course will provide an overview of several health areas (e.g., nutrition, physical activity, sexual health, substance use, etc.) and then for each area we will focus more specifically on a few current trends or issues. A practical, hands on approach will emphasize information, resources, and skills to help students achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, as well as an understanding of the broader health issues facing our current society.


Instructor: 
Janis Hampton, M.S. (UNC-Greensboro) is Assistant Professor in the Department of Health, Wellness and Physical Education. Her fields of teaching and research interest center on developing awareness of health and fitness issues for the general population as well as young adults.

PHYSICS 89S CONNECTED BY SOUND (ALP, NS, CCI, STS)


Most people live their lives surrounded by sounds. The particular mixture of sounds a person experiences varies with hen and where a life is lived, economic and social status, and choices made by oneself and by others nearby. “Soundscape” recently has become a popular term for referring to such acoustic environments. How would your soundscape be different if you had been born into some other era or culture? What effects have soundscapes had on literature, music, personal safety and health? What effects have they had on connections among people and other animals? How does sound connect architecture with theatre and music, technology with safety and health, one historic time and place with another? What important roles has sound played in science, warfare, and politics? What influence is your soundscape having on your future – on your music, on your outlook, on who you are? Only very recently did sound recordings join oral tradition and visual and written records as tools for preserving our cultural past. The current interest in better understanding past soundscapes is yielding a wealth of material (mostly written) for exploring profound sound-mediated influences among a wide range of fields of study. In addition to using such materials, students in this course will make and share their own audio recordings to examine and document soundscapes of today. Recent class projects in this seminar have included production of an MP3 event for the whole University community and use of computer simulations to recreate the sound of a long-lost performance space.


Instructor: 
Dewey Lawson, Ph.D. (Duke University) is an Adjunct Professor of Physics. His fields of teaching and research interests are in acoustics, including sound in liquid and solid helium at ultra-low temperatures, room acoustics, musical instrument acoustics, environmental acoustics and cochlear prostheses.

POLSCI 89S/ENVIRON 89S/ETHICS ENVIRONMENTALISM AND AMERICAN VALUES (EI)


Exploration of whether core American values such as individualism, equality and self-rule are compatible with environmentalism; ongoing debates about public land use and environmental regulation will be explored in detail, as will recent efforts to create an alternative to the industrial food system. Readings include Jefferson, Thoreau, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Wendell Berry, Michael Pollan, and Julie Gruthman.

Instructor: 
Nora Hanagan, Ph.D. (Duke University) is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science. Her research interests include American political thought, democratic theory, feminist theory, and food and politics. She is currently writing an article on the local food movement, and completing a book manuscript that brings the ideas of Henry David Thoreau, Jane Addams, Dewey and Martin Luther King, Jr. to bear on contemporary debates about responsibility and citizenship.

PSY 89S BEYOND REASON: EMPATHY AND IDENTITY (SS, NS, R, W)


Developmental science approach to integrating knowledge across the biological and social sciences and humanities about engaging difference and the nature, development, and enhancement of personal epistemology, empathy, and identity. Videotaped clinical cases and documentary films are used to stimulate reflection and discussion.


Instructor: Robert J. Thompson, Jr, Ph.D. (University of North Dakota) is Professor of Psychology. His research interests include how biological and psychosocial processes act together in human development; the adaptation of children and their families to developmental problems and chronic illnesses, including sickle cell disease and cystic fibrosis; and the assessment of teaching and learning in higher education.

PUBPOL 89S NARRATIVE AND LEADERSHIP (SS, CCI)

This course explores the role of stories and storytelling in public leadership. It considers how stories operate in mind and culture, affecting beliefs, attitudes, and interests; constructing identities; and motivating behavior. Through examples drawn from social movements, political campaigns, presidential leadership, community initiatives, and sports, it investigates how stories motivate leaders and move communities, and help students develop storytelling as a leadership skill.


Instructor: 
Frederick Mayer, Ph.D. (Harvard University) is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Political Science in the Sanford School of Public Policy, and Director of the Program on Global Policy and Governance. His research interests include international trade policy, globalization and governance, philanthropic foundations, narrative and politics, international negotiations, North American Studies, and political analysis.

RELIGION 89S/JEWISHST 89S MESSIAHS AND MESSIANIC MOVEMENTS  (ALP, CZ, CCI, EI)


An investigation and analysis of messianic figures, ideas, and movements from the biblical period to the present day. Focus will be on the Jewish tradition, with comparative material from Christianity and Islam included. The theoretical and practical implications of the concept as it is interpreted by members of different, interacting, and at times conflicting traditions will be explored. The social, cultural, and ethical motivations for and consequences of the movements (among leaders, followers, and opponents) will be of primary interest. Readings will emphasize engagement with primary sources in translation. The written assignments, including biweekly essays, a critical book review, and a final research paper, will engage students in various aspects of research in the field of Religion.
Instructor: Laura Lieber 
Laura Lieber, Ph.D. (University of Chicago) is an Associate Professor of Religion and Jewish Studies, focusing on religious expression and experience within the Jewish community and in the context of the larger society.


Instructor: Shalom Goldman, Ph.D. (New York University) is a Professor of Religion and is a specialist in comparative monotheisms.
Both instructors teach a wide range of courses in Jewish Studies, ranging from the world of biblical antiquity to the present day.

RELIGION 89S/AMES 89S MODERN HINDUISM: COLONIAL AND NATIONALIST CONTEXTS  (CZ, CCI, EI)


The names "Hinduism," a religion, and "India," a nation, are derived from the same word. What's at stake in mapping one onto the other? This course introduces a basic set of Hindu teachings and traces their development--and their historical establishment as "basic"--through the period of modernity in South Asia, which is to say, from the consolidation of British colonial rule to the present. A focal point will be Hindutva, or Hindu nationalism, and its rival formulations. Alongside primary texts representing modern Hindu thinkers—Vivekananda and Gandhi, among others—we will engage theories of modernity, examine contemporary case studies, and analyze several Indian films.


Instructor: William Elison, Ph.D. (University of Chicago) is a Visiting Professor of Religion. His fields of teaching and research interests include religions of south Asia, modern India, urban ethnography, Adivasis (Indian “tribal” communities), Hindi popular cinema (Bollywood), Indian public culture and slums.

THEATRST 89S ACTING BASICS  (ALP)


It’s a common misconception many beginning actors make: acting is pretending. Action, by definition, is based in reality but we rarely see that on the stage, in television, or on film. Most performances seem to be self-involved, shallow, forced, and self-conscious as a result of this belief that we have to PRETEND to react to what’s going on in front of us. By inflating your awareness and developing deeper sensibilities and listening skills, we can not only gain ease and purpose on stage but create an identifiable reality for the actor and the audience. We will begin to find this through physical group exercises. We will use ACTION as the basis of our technique. We will work with one another in a close and responsible way, considering our partner's/partners' safety above all.


Instructor: Dana Marks, M.F.A. (American Repertory Theatre/Moscow Art Theatre Institute for Advanced Theatre Training at Harvard University) is an actor, teacher, and director based in Durham, NC, teaching acting and movement here at Duke.

THEATRST 89S EVERYBODY’S A CRITIC (ALP, W)


Explore and develop your own critical capacity as you take up key questions in the fields of dramatic and cinematic criticism. How much power should a reviewer have? What role should personal taste play in a critic's review? Should a review be anything more than a consumer guide? Should a critic also be a theater/filmmaker? What is the future of the critic? Specifically, this class will focus on the art and history of dramatic criticism from its inception in the late 19th century to the present day. Students will study and imitate the writing of famous theater critics (Shaw, Tynan, Clurman, Simon, and Brustein) as well as film critics (Kauffman, Ebert, and Turan). Since the course focuses on writing for publication, students will see and review multiple productions and films. Reviews will then be workshopped and published online. During the revision process, students will also act as editors for others in the course.


Instructor: Marshall Botvinick, M.F.A. (A.R.T./MXAT Institute for Advanced Theater Training at Harvard University) is a Visiting Lecturer, teaching Dramaturgy, Theater Historiography, Script Analysis, and Dramatic Criticism. His research interests include trends in new play development and trends in grantmaking and funding for non-profit theaters.

VMS 89S GIRLS GO GLOBAL (ALP, SS, CCI, EI, R)
 Cross-listed – See course description under WOMENST 89S


Instructor: Kimberly Lamm

VMS 89S MAPPING AND MODELING VENICE  (ALP, CZ)


Beginning with Napoleon's forced entry into the city in 1797 and the fall of a more than 1000 year old Republic, the urban landscape of Venice experienced notable change. Significant intervention included the destruction of many Renaissance monuments and, therefore, great loss to the architectural and artistic patrimony of the city. The goal of this Wired! course is to map the urban landscape of early modern Venice by re-constructing lost architectural gems of the fifteenth and sixteenth century along with their immediate surroundings. To accomplish this, students in this freshman seminar will use digital tools, such as Google Sketch up, to translate historical and modern maps, prints, engravings and paintings into 3-D models. In addition to the exterior reconstruction of the buildings, students will use inventories and various imagery to recreate interior spaces. These monuments will be mapped onto present-day Venice. The course assumes no prior art historical or digital experience; students will be provided with the background necessary to understand the art and architectural history of early modern Venice, and the skills required for the digital technology.


Instructor: Kristin Lanzoni, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Art, Art History and Visual Studies.  Her teaching and research interests include Renaissance and Baroque Art History. This seminar is supported by a grant from the Humanities Writ Large.

WOMENST 89S/LIT 89S/VMS 89S GIRLS GO GLOBAL (ALP, SS, CCI, EI, R)


An exploration of how girlhood is imagined, represented, and lived around the globe. Looking at modern and contemporary film and literature in which girls play a central role, as well as aspects of visual and material culture (fashion, dolls, and video games) designed with girls in mind, we will think about the cultural meanings attributed to girls. What kinds of images, stories, and objects have girls from the United States, West Africa, Japan, and Iran been given to imagine themselves in the world? How have girls created cultures for themselves? How do representations of girls reflect culturally specific ideas about traditions, morals, and ethics? What do representations of and by girls tell us about the possibilities for and limitations upon freedom and gender equity in a world increasingly shaped by consumer culture?


Instructor: Kimberly Lamm, Ph.D. ( University of Washington) is an Assistant Professor of Arts of the Moving Image. Her research is located at the place where feminist theory, American studies, and contemporary art and poetics meet. She has published essays on a range of topics, from African-American visual culture to American poetry’s relationship to feminist theory. Her work has appeared in Callaloo, Michigan Feminist Studies, American Quarterly, and the anthology Unmaking Race, Remaking Soul. Her current book project, “Inadequacies and Interruptions: Language and Feminist Reading Practices in Contemporary Art,” explores how contemporary artists incorporate language into their visual productions to create feminist and anti-racist readings of spectacle culture.