Careers

Careers & More

For you, life after Duke might include your first professional job, or graduate school, or a year spent teaching or traveling. Whatever your interests are, talk with your advisors about how to prepare in the best way possible.

Interested in what other Alumni have Done?

What's one way to see the legacy of a great university? Watch what its alumni do. Here are just a few of the Duke alumni who are making a difference in the world today.

Alumni Career Survey

We conducted an alumni survey in 2013 to track the career paths of our undergraduates over time. We looked at more than 30 career categories and grouped majors by four major divisions: humanities, natural sciences, social sciences and engineering. We surveyed the class of 1993 (20 years after graduation), the class of 2003 (10 years after graduation), and the class of 2008 (5 years after graduation). Our overall response rate was roughly 30%, and the number of respondents (as well as response rate in parentheses) for each class was: Class of 1993 = 319 (29%), Class of 2003 = (30%), and the Class of 2008 = 493 (32%).

Career Networking - the Power of Being a Duke Alumnus

When you combine the talent and expertise of Duke alumni with their expansive global reach, you get a powerful professional network capable of influencing success in any industry. The Duke Alumni Association puts this dynamic network at your fingertips. Log in today.

Leadership Training - Practice, Service, Mentorship

The Hart Fellows Program (HFP) offers recent Duke graduates ten-month fellowships with organizations abroad that are facing complex social, political and humanitarian problems. This capstone experience helps Fellows develop their own vision for ethical leadership as they move into professional life. Since its inception in 1995, 92 Hart Fellows have served community partner organizations in 38 countries across six continents.

Hart Fellows engage in research service-learning (RSL): they produce community-based research projects of tangible benefit to the organizations they serve, while engaging in structured, critical reflection about their work. Fellows are paired with experienced mentors within their host organizations, and gain direct experience working on global issues such as forced migration, HIV/AIDS, and youth-focused poverty alleviation. Fellows help to build organizational capacity, write grants and document programs.

The Hart Fellows Program is designed to build Fellows’ capacity for leadership outside of conventional professional knowledge.