Ancient Greek Justice

CLST 312S

We will read and discuss a selection of ancient Greek works (in English translation) that revolve around the key civilizing notion of ‘justice’ (dike). In their original cultural contexts, these works served to explore the meaning of ‘justice’ for the individual and his community and to model how justice should be pursued and secured. The texts selected include Hesiod’s "Works and Days," Homer’s "Odyssey," Aeschylus’ dramatic trilogy the "Oresteia," and Plato’s dialogue the "Republic."

In our class meetings, we will seek to understand these texts in their historical settings and will consider their implications for us today, allowing them to inform and challenge our moral imagination. 

Explore the culture and customs of these countries: 
Greece
Explore these religions: 
Ethical Culture, Paganism
Relevance to other majors: 
Relevant to all majors and programs that engage with issues of social and personal justice.
Faculty: 

Jose Gonzalez, jose.gonzalez@duke.edu

Areas of Knowledge: 
CCI, CZ
Modes of Inquiry: 
EI
Film, Visual & Performing Arts?
No
Literature in Translation?
Yes