Greek History

CLST 528S

This course will explore ways in which democratic ancient Athens conceived of legal and social status, for both citizens and non. Here was the first experiment with radical democracy in the west. But who was included and excluded and on what terms and logic? How did Athenian law define and treat categories of person within the state's compass? Slaves, freedmen, and foreigners? Male, female, and minor citizens? Bastards, homosexuals, and sex-workers? How did law and social norms work together to shape behavior within different groups? and where did they clash?

Explore the culture and customs of these countries: 
Greece
Explore these religions: 
Paganism
Relevance to other majors: 
This course investigates how states define individual rights, by studying an early polity that had not quite yet defined what a 'right' was. We can see Athens struggling to frame a set of practices, sometimes coherent, sometimes not, and in any case still distinctly pre-modern. Thus, it should be illuminating not only historians and classicists, but also to anyone interested in law, policy, political science, especially in their historical dimensions.
Faculty: 

Joshua Sosin, joshua.sosin@duke.edu

Crosslisting Numbers: 
HISTORY 528S
Areas of Knowledge: 
CZ
Modes of Inquiry: 
CCI
Film, Visual & Performing Arts?
No
Literature in Translation?
Yes