Trinity Scholars Interviewed on Race and Policing

Trinity Scholars Interviewed on Race and Policing

The Trinity College of Arts & Sciences has a long history of producing scholarship about race, racism and policing. Since protests erupted over the killing of George Floyd, several Trinity faculty members have been called on numerous times to share their expertise and insight with the public. Here are some of their books, articles and other media.

This photo was taken at the 1969 occupation of Duke's Allen Building, one of the most well-known instances of Black activism at the university.

Laura Edwards headshotLaura Edwards

The Peabody Family Distinguished Professor of history is more focused on gender than race, but her research also centers on legal issues, particularly in the U.S. South around the Civil War. As a result, Edwards' distinguished body of work offers crucial insights into the history and practice of policing in the United States.

Media

Academic Work

Karla Holloway headshotKarla FC Holloway

The James B. Duke Distinguished Professor Emerita of English, Holloway is a distinguished scholar whose work delves into the intersections of African American cultural studies, biocultural studies, gender, ethics and law. A long-time university leader—she served as Dean of the Humanities and Social Sciences and was founding co-director of the John Hope Franklin Center and the Franklin Humanities Institute, among other positions—Holloway also writes fiction and literary non-fiction, in addition to her academic works.

Media

Academic Work

Literary Work

Adriane Lentz-Smith headshotAdriane Lentz-Smith

An associate professor of history, Lentz-Smith focuses on the 20th century. She has explored the long Civil Rights movement, beginning in World War I, and she is currently at work on a new book titled The Slow Death of Sagon Penn: State Violence, and the Twilight of Civil Rights, which begins with one man’s devastating encounter with the police in 1985 and explores how state violence and white supremacy remade and sustained themselves.

Media

Academic Work

Did we miss someone? If you know of any Duke scholars who have been in the media speaking about race, protests and policing or anti-Black racism who aren't included here, please email Matt Hartman at matthew.hartman@duke.edu.

(Header photo courtesy of University Archives Photograph Collection, Duke University Archives, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.)